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8 Reasons You're Losing Sleep

Avoid these culprits to get a better night's rest

By Sheryl Kraft and Grandparents.com
E-Readers

(This article previously appeared in Grandparents.com)

As if there weren’t enough things keeping you tossing and turning each night, here’s a new one: Using short-wave, blue light-emitting e-readers, like the iPad, iPhone, Nook Color, Kindle and Kindle Fire before bedtime can make it harder to fall asleep, according to a December 2014 study at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

"When blue light hits the optic nerve, it tells the brain to stop producing melatonin," which is "the key that starts the engine for sleep," says Michael Breus, diplomate of the American Board of Sleep Medicine and fellow of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. "This is especially problematic, since as you get older, the ability to produce melatonin becomes even more compromised."

A Warm Bath

Body temperature naturally begins to drop before bedtime, preparing us for sleep. Although a warm bath can relax and calm you, taking one too close to bedtime will not give your body enough of a chance to cool sufficiently to bring on slumber.

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Stress

When you’re stressed, your body secretes cortisol, a hormone produced by the adrenal gland. This can disrupt the body’s natural rhythm, says Naiman. "Cortisol is naturally produced in the morning. It peaks at around 8 a.m., when it can be helpful to naturally energize us,” he explains. "But at the wrong time—like nighttime—it can make us hyper-aroused and disrupt our sleep."

Fixes: In addition to yoga for relaxation, a new study in adults over 55 finds that practicing a popular form of meditation known as mindfulness meditation can reap improvements in sleep quality and reduce insomnia and fatigue. Mindfulness meditation can also help reduce stress, according to a 2009 Massachusetts General Hospital study. Visit Mindful.org to learn some basics.(MORE: 6 Health Risks of Poor Sleep)

If meditation is not your thing, there’s always a good old-fashioned belly laugh; laughter actually induces physical changes in your body, says the Mayo Clinic. It cools your stress response and can increase positive thoughts, which, in turn, causes your body to release neuropeptides to help fight stress.

Sheryl Kraft is a freelance journalist, essayist and writer of non-fiction based in Fairfield County, Conn. Her writing covers all areas, with a concentration in health, wellness and fitness. Read More
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