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Work & Purpose

Tips on Working From Home Due to the Coronavirus

5 stories we've published to help you work remotely in a time of coronavirus


Part of the The Coronavirus Outbreak: What You Need to Know Special Report

With the coronavirus spread, I’ve seen a rush of companies telling employees to work from home, including Microsoft, Facebook and Amazon. Long before that, many people have been considering the possibility of working remotely. But who could have anticipated a scary health concern would be the impetus to make them so eager?

I’m one of those people who works from home (editing and writing stories for our Work & Purpose and Money & Policy channels), and am happy to be able to work remotely. As part of our workplace reporting, we’ve written quite a bit about the pros and cons of remote work. So, here, as part of our continuous coverage about the coronavirus, are five Next Avenue stories to help you take that next step with working at home:

Man working from home7 Things to Know if You Want to Work From Home — As writer Wendy Helfenbaum explains, if you have never telecommuted before, you’ll face some new challenges. You may need to reconfigure a room to transform it into an efficient home office. Distractions will abound. And you may have to quickly master new (to you) technology, allowing you to communicate easily with your colleagues (more about tech issues in the story below, “Want to Be a Remote Worker? Get These Digital Skills”). In this article, Helfenbaum offers advice about all of these.

The tricky part about working from home is drawing a line between your job and your home life.

How to Get Your Boss to Let You Work From Home” — If your employer hasn’t required you to work from home due to the coronavirus and hasn’t offered remote work as an option, you’ll want to read this piece by blogger, career coach and work-from-home pro Nancy Collamer. In it, she provides tips that will help persuade your boss that letting you work from home will be good for both of you.

Our Commitment to Covering the Coronavirus

We are committed to reliable reporting on the risks of the coronavirus and steps you can take to benefit you, your loved ones and others in your community. Read Next Avenue’s Coronavirus Coverage.

8 Ways to Balance Home and Office Life Under the Same Roof” — The tricky part about working from home is drawing a line between your job and your home life. That’s especially true if you don’t have a home office. In this article, Lisa Kanarek offers pointers to prevent working from home from turning into working all-the-time at home.

Woman working from home

4 Ways to Combat the Isolation of Remote Work “ — When you work from home, it’s easy to feel lonely and isolated. After all, you can’t stop by a colleague’s desk to chat or go to lunch with your team members. Here, Nancy Collamer suggests a few tips and techniques to prevent you from feeling lonely as a remote worker — based on her experience and advice from other experts.

Want to Be a Remote Worker? Get These Digital Skills” — Michelle V. Rafter, an authority on the intersection of work and technology, recommends useful apps for remote work, plus where to go to learn new digital skills.

The 5 Next Avenue Stories About Working From Home:

7 Things to Know if You Want to Work From Home

How to Get Your Boss to Let You Work From Home

8 Ways to Balance Home and Office Life Under the Same Roof

4 Ways to Combat the Isolation of Remote Work

Want to Be a Remote Worker? Get These Digital Skills

RIchard Eisenberg, editor at Next Avenue wearing a suit jacket in front of a teal background.
By Richard Eisenberg
Richard Eisenberg is the Senior Web Editor of the Money & Security and Work & Purpose channels of Next Avenue and Managing Editor for the site. He is the author of How to Avoid a Mid-Life Financial Crisis and has been a personal finance editor at Money, Yahoo, Good Housekeeping, and CBS MoneyWatch. Follow him on Twitter.

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