Sponsored

Health

How to Cook Every Part of a Pumpkin

9 recipes that use this seasonal vegetable in unexpected ways


1 of 11
< Next >

Sponsored

Pumpkin Cooking Challenge

pumpkin recipes

Credit: Getty Images

(This article previously appeared on Rewire.org.)

Walk the aisles at Trader Joe’s — where you can find everything from cold-pressed pumpkin juice to Autumnal Harvest Creamy Pasta Sauce — and it becomes clear that carving jack-o’-lanterns (and poorly at that) just doesn’t cut it.

I should be doing more with this member of the squash family. I love baking acorn squash, after all. I routinely add summer squash to pasta dishes. And last fall, I went all out and made some delightful butternut squash soup.

This year, I’ve decided to be a better pumpkin consumer. I’m challenging myself to make at least one recipe using each edible part of the pumpkin — seeds, flesh and skin.

Next slide: Ideas for every part of the pumpkin.

 

Pumpkin Chips and Other Tips

Credit: Heidi Raschke

What to do with all of those pumpkin parts? Let's start with the basics:

Seeds: Packed with nutrients, pumpkin seeds. They’re delightful simply roasted and lightly salted or added to some granola.

Flesh: Pumpkin puree can be used for … So. Many. Things. Most recipes that call for canned pumpkin can be made with your homemade pumpkin puree. That includes sweets such as breads, muffins, cake and, of course, pie as well as savories such as soups, pastas and even baked beans.

Skin: That’s right. Pumpkin skin. Peel the skin off of your roasted pumpkin and dehydrate it into a crispy snack. You can make a chip out of pretty much anything and pumpkin is no exception. You can also use the shell as a serving bowl for soup.

Now read on for 9 inventive pumpkin recipes from PBS Food.

1. Salted Honey Cranberry Pumpkin Seed Bars

Credit: PBS Food

Ingredients

For the Shortbread Base:

  • 1 cup + 2 Tbsp light spelt flour
  • 1/3 cup coconut oil (refined, not extra-virgin)
  • 2 Tbsp honey
  • Zest of one whole organic lemon or orange (about 2 tsp)
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt

For the Topping:

1/3 cup dried cranberries (preferably the organic and apple juice sweetened kind)

  • 3/4 cup raw pumpkin seeds
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 2 Tbsp coconut oil (refined, not extra-virgin)
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350F. Place your jar of coconut oil in a bowl of hot water so that it liquifies completely. Be sure to use refined coconut oil which has a neutral taste. In a large bowl mix the spelt, salt, liquified coconut oil, honey, and citrus zest. Mix together well until a soft uniform dough is obtained. Press this dough into the bottom an 8-inch square baking pan that has been lined with parchment paper for easy removal. Try to evenly cover the bottom of the pan.
  2. To make the filling, simply mix all the ingredients together very well (making sure you use liquified coconut oil here as well so it integrates easily). Pour this sticky mixture on top of the shortbread base and carefully spread it out evenly. Don’t worry if the honey isn’t completely evenly distributed, you can fix this during baking.
  3. Place the pan in the oven on a rack in the upper third portion. Check about 15 minutes in and tip the pan slowly from side to side to swirl the melted honey around gently if necessary to make sure the seeds are evenly coated. At 25 minutes, check again to make sure nothing is burning. Your bars should be ready around the 30 minute mark, when the seeds look ever so slightly toasted and the edges are a bit golden. Remove from the oven and cool in the pan for about 20 minutes. Remove from the pan by pulling the sides of the parchment paper and allow the bars to finish cooling completely before slicing. Slice using a large sharp knife, using quick decisive strokes to cut into clean bars.
  4. The bars will store for several weeks in a cookie tin kept in a cool place.

Yield: Makes about 12 bars

Read more about this recipe on PBS Food.

2. Back-to-School Granola Bars

Credit: PBS Food

Ingredients

  • 1 cup rolled oats (preferably not instant oats)
  • 1 1/2 cup crispy rice cereal
  • 3 tbsp flour (gluten-free flour will work)
  • 1/2 cup pumpkin seeds
  • 1/2 cup roughly chopped pecans
  • 1/2 cup dried unsweetened coconut
  • 1/2 cup dried cranberries or raisins
  • 1/4 cup chocolate chips for the top (optional)
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp cinnamon (optional)
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 3/4 cup honey
  • 1/4 cup almond butter (or peanut butter)

Directions

  1. Place the oats, pumpkin seeds, and chopped pecans on a baking sheet and toast for 15 minutes in a 300F oven, stirring once or twice. Leave the oven on.
  2. In a large bowl mix the crispy rice cereal, flour, coconut, cranberries, salt, and cinnamon. Add the toasted oats mixture and mix all together.
  3. In a small saucepan, bring the honey and butter to a gentle boil on low heat. Simmer on low for 5 minutes, stirring often. Remove from heat and add vanilla and almond butter.
  4. Mix into the dry ingredients and incorporate completely.
  5. Line a 9 x 13 inch baking pan (or 8 x 8 inch pan if making half the recipe) with buttered parchment paper. Pour the mixture into the pan. If desired, sprinkle chocolate chips on top. Use buttered hands or an oiled spatula to press mixture firmly into pan.
  6. Bake in 300F oven for 30 minutes, checking at 25 minutes as some ovens bake more quickly than others. Allow the bars to cool in the pan completely before cutting them.
  7. When completely cool, remove the whole thing from pan by pulling the parchment paper at the ends.
  8. Place parchment and bars on a cutting board and cut into slices. The bars will keep for several weeks and for longer in the fridge (or freezer).

Read more about this recipe on PBS Food.

3. Pumpkin and Sunflower Seed Savory Biscuits

Credit: PBS Food

Ingredients

For the onion and caraway seed chutney:

  • 4 red onions, chopped
  • 50g (1¾ oz) caster sugar
  • 1 tsp caraway seeds, toasted and ground
  • 50ml (2 fl oz) red wine vinegar
  • 50ml (2 fl oz) red wine
  • 1-2 tsp blackcurrant cordial, to taste
  • For the biscuits:
  • 140g (5 oz) rye flour
  • 70g (2½ oz) wholemeal flour
  • 70g (2½ oz) plain flour
  • 55g (2 oz) pumpkin seeds
  • 55g (2 oz) sunflower seeds
  • 25g (1 oz) chives, chopped
  • 1 tsp English mustard powder
  • 1 tsp table salt
  • 1½ tsp baking powder
  • 30g (1 oz) sun-dried tomato paste
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • mature cheddar cheese, to serve

Directions

  1. For the onion and caraway seed chutney, put the onions and sugar in saucepan with the caraway seeds. Cover with a tight-fitting lid and cook for 10 minutes over a medium heat
  2. Add the vinegar and red wine and simmer for about 20 minutes more. Add a little blackcurrant cordial, to taste, and set aside to cool.
  3. Meanwhile, to clean the jam jars, preheat the oven to 140C/275F/Gas 1. Wash two jars well in warm soapy water then rinse thoroughly under running water. Leave the jars and lids to dry, upside down, in the oven. (Or you can clean the jars by putting them through the hot cycle of a dishwasher.)
  4. Carefully spoon the chutney into the sterilized jars and seal while hot. Store in a cool, dark place for up to a month if not eating immediately.
  5. Preheat the oven to 200C/400F/Gas 6.
  6. For the biscuits, mix the rye, wholemeal and plain flour in a large bowl. Add the seeds, chopped chives, mustard powder, salt and baking powder. Stir in the sun-dried tomato paste and olive oil until combined. Add 180ml (6 fl oz) water and bring the mixture together to form a dough.
  7. Lightly flour a work surface and knead the dough for about five minutes, or until the dough is smooth and elastic (it’s ready when the dough doesn’t tear readily).
  8. Lightly grease a large clean bowl, add the dough and cover with cling film. Set aside for 15 minutes to rest.
  9. Meanwhile, cut out a piece of baking parchment to match the size of the baking sheet.
  10. When the dough is rested, cut the dough in half. On a lightly floured work surface, roll out the dough using a rolling pin until it is as thin as possible. Try to keep the dough in a rectangle that will fit neatly on the baking sheet and keep lifting the dough gently to ensure it’s not sticking to the work surface (add extra flour if necessary).
  11. Lay the prepared baking parchment on top of the dough ensuring the baking parchment covers the dough completely. Using a rolling pin to help you lift the delicate dough onto the baking sheet, roll the baking parchment and dough over the rolling pin with the baking parchment against the rolling pin. Place carefully on the baking sheet - the baking parchment should be on top.
  12. Bake for about seven minutes, then remove from the oven and lift off the baking parchment. Flip over the dough (if you do it quickly with your hands, you shouldn’t burn yourself but you can use a tea towel to protect yourself from the hot dough) and re-cover with the baking parchment. Bake for another seven minutes.
  13. Remove the dough from the baking parchment and sheet. Place on a work surface and, using a sharp 7cm (2¾ in) cutter (preferably with a handle), cut out as many circles as you can get from the dough. You may need a knife to cut through seeds.
  14. Place each circle back on the baking sheet and return to the oven for five minutes. When crisp, place the biscuits on a cooling rack.
  15. Repeat to use the remaining dough.
  16. Serve the cooled biscuits with mature cheddar and a dollop of chutney.

Read more about this recipe on PBS Food.

4. Pumpkin Waffles

Credit: PBS Food

Ingredients

For the Dry Mix:

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup, plus 2 tablespoons, light brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon cloves

For the Wet Mix:

  • 2 cups buttermilk, shaken
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1/2 cup canned pumpkin puree
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • Cooking spray

Directions

    1. In a large bowl, whisk together the all-purpose flour, light brown sugar, ground cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda, salt, ground ginger, nutmeg and cloves. 
    2. To a 2-cup measuring cup or small bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, egg, pumpkin puree and vanilla extract. In one addition, pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and mix just until the speckles of flour are no longer visible. 
    3. Preheat your waffle iron per the manufacture’s instructions - each one is slightly different. Spray the inside irons and pour the batter into the iron and close the lid. Cook per the recommended cook time; my machine cooks each waffle for about 4 minutes and it always seems to be about right. Repeat with the remaining waffles. My vote is to serve them right when they come out of the iron. If you’d like, you can place the waffles in a preheated 200 degree oven to keep them warm while you make the few batches. The only problem with this is they might get a little soggier than you’d like. Serve with warm maple syrup and a pat of butter.

Read more about this recipe on PBS Food.

5. Pumpkin Soup with Dukkah

Credit: PBS Food

Ingredients

For the onion and caraway seed chutney:

  • 4 red onions, chopped
  • 50g (1¾ oz) caster sugar
  • 1 tsp caraway seeds, toasted and ground
  • 50ml (2 fl oz) red wine vinegar
  • 50ml (2 fl oz) red wine
  • 1-2 tsp blackcurrant cordial, to taste

For the biscuits:

  • 140g (5 oz) rye flour
  • 70g (2½ oz) wholemeal flour
  • 70g (2½ oz) plain flour
  • 55g (2 oz) pumpkin seeds
  • 55g (2 oz) sunflower seeds
  • 25g (1 oz) chives, chopped
  • 1 tsp English mustard powder
  • 1 tsp table salt
  • 1½ tsp baking powder
  • 30g (1 oz) sun-dried tomato paste
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • mature cheddar cheese, to serve

Directions

  1. For the onion and caraway seed chutney, put the onions and sugar in saucepan with the caraway seeds. Cover with a tight-fitting lid and cook for 10 minutes over a medium heat
  2. Add the vinegar and red wine and simmer for about 20 minutes more. Add a little blackcurrant cordial, to taste, and set aside to cool.
  3. Meanwhile, to clean the jam jars, preheat the oven to 140C/275F/Gas 1. Wash two jars well in warm soapy water then rinse thoroughly under running water. Leave the jars and lids to dry, upside down, in the oven. (Or you can clean the jars by putting them through the hot cycle of a dishwasher.)
  4. Carefully spoon the chutney into the sterilized jars and seal while hot. Store in a cool, dark place for up to a month if not eating immediately.
  5. Preheat the oven to 200C/400F/Gas 6.
  6. For the biscuits, mix the rye, wholemeal and plain flour in a large bowl. Add the seeds, chopped chives, mustard powder, salt and baking powder. Stir in the sun-dried tomato paste and olive oil until combined. Add 180ml (6 fl oz) water and bring the mixture together to form a dough.
  7. Lightly flour a work surface and knead the dough for about five minutes, or until the dough is smooth and elastic (it’s ready when the dough doesn’t tear readily).
  8. Lightly grease a large clean bowl, add the dough and cover with cling film. Set aside for 15 minutes to rest.
  9. Meanwhile, cut out a piece of baking parchment to match the size of the baking sheet.
  10. When the dough is rested, cut the dough in half. On a lightly floured work surface, roll out the dough using a rolling pin until it is as thin as possible. Try to keep the dough in a rectangle that will fit neatly on the baking sheet and keep lifting the dough gently to ensure it’s not sticking to the work surface (add extra flour if necessary).
  11. Lay the prepared baking parchment on top of the dough ensuring the baking parchment covers the dough completely. Using a rolling pin to help you lift the delicate dough onto the baking sheet, roll the baking parchment and dough over the rolling pin with the baking parchment against the rolling pin. Place carefully on the baking sheet - the baking parchment should be on top.
  12. Bake for about seven minutes, then remove from the oven and lift off the baking parchment. Flip over the dough (if you do it quickly with your hands, you shouldn’t burn yourself but you can use a tea towel to protect yourself from the hot dough) and re-cover with the baking parchment. Bake for another seven minutes.
  13. Remove the dough from the baking parchment and sheet. Place on a work surface and, using a sharp 7cm (2¾ in) cutter (preferably with a handle), cut out as many circles as you can get from the dough. You may need a knife to cut through seeds.
  14. Place each circle back on the baking sheet and return to the oven for five minutes. When crisp, place the biscuits on a cooling rack.
  15. Repeat to use the remaining dough.
  16. Serve the cooled biscuits with mature cheddar and a dollop of chutney.

Read more about this recipe on PBS Food.

6. Pumpkin Alfredo with Ricotta Stuffed Shells

Credit: PBS Food

Ingredients

  • 12 ounces of pasta (about 26 jumbo shells)

For the Ricotta Filling:

  • 1 cup ricotta
  • 1/4 cup shredded mozzarella
  • 1 large egg
  • 3 fresh basil leaves, minced
  • 3 fresh sage leaves, minced
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • Pinch of crushed red pepper

For the Pumpkin Alfredo Sauce:

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 shallot, minced
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 3/4 cup canned pure pumpkin puree
  • 2 to 3 fresh sage
  • 2 tablespoons yogurt or labneh or creme fraiche (basically something tart!)
  • 1/4 cup grated parmesan cheese, plus more for garnish
  • Pinch of nutmeg
  • Salt
  • Freshly cracked black pepper

Directions

  1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add pasta shells and cook until al dente, about 8 minutes. Reserve about 1 cup of pasta water and set it aside (we’re going to use it with the sauce later on). Drain the pasta and toss with a teaspoon of olive oil (this will ensure the pasta doesn’t stick). Set aside.
  2. Preheat the one to 375 degrees F. To a small bowl, whisk together the ricotta, mozzarella, egg, minced basil and sage, garlic, salt and crushed red pepper.
  3. In a medium saucepan, set over medium heat. Cook the butter, stirring constantly, until it begins to foam and brown speckles appear. Keep stirring until the foam subsides and the color turns medium brown. Add the shallots and garlic clove and turn down the heat to medium­low. Cook until the shallots have softened, about 1 minute.
  4. Stir in the pumpkin, sprigs of sage, yogurt or labneh or creme fraiche, Parmesan and 1/2 to 3/4 cup reserved pasta water. The sauce should be sauce­y! It will thicken as it bakes with the shells so feel free to add a bit more pasta water, if needed.
  5. Stuff each shell with a spoonful of the ricotta mixture and arrange in a 2 3/4-Qt braiser or 13x9 inch casserole dish. Pour the sauce around the shells and cover with a sheet of foil. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes.

Read more about this recipe on PBS Food.

7. Creamy Pumpkin Sage Fettuccine

Credit: PBS Food

Ingredients

For the Creamy Pumpkin Sage Sauce:

  • 4 Tbsp butter
  • 1 Tbsp minced fresh sage
  • 3/4 cup half and half cream
  • 1 cup pumpkin puree (about half of a small roasted pumpkin)
  • 1/2 cup grated parmesan
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
  • Grated nutmeg, to taste

For the Homemade Pumpkin Sage Pasta (or substitute 1 lb. of store-bought fettuccine):

  • 2 cups flour
  • 1/4 cup pumpkin purée
  • 2 small eggs
  • A few finely minced sage leaves (optional)
  • A pinch of ground turmeric (optional, for a deeper color)

For the Sage Chips (optional garnish):

  • 12 fresh sage leaves
  • 1/4 cup grapeseed oil (or another good non-GMO frying oil)
  • pinch of sea salt

Directions

  1. You can make the pasta by hand or you can use a food processor if you prefer. In a small bowl, whisk the turmeric and sage into the flour. Pour the flour onto a clean surface, heaped in a mound, and use your hand to make an indentation in the middle. Crack the two eggs and into this hollow space and add the pumpkin purée as well. Blend the eggs and pumpkin with a fork, slowly incorporating them into the flour and pushing in more flour with your other hand. As the dough starts to come together, use your hands to gradually begin to shape it into a rough ball, collecting all the remaining flour as you go. Knead the dough for a few minutes until it becomes smooth. If the dough is too dry, add a tiny bit of water, half a teaspoon at a time. The dough should feel a little sticky. However, bits of dough should not be sticking to your hands or the countertop. If it is too sticky, add a little flour (a tablespoonful at a time), continuing to knead between each addition. Cover with a damp clean cloth, and allow the dough to rest for about 30 minutes.
  2. After 30 minutes, cut the ball into 8 pieces. Dust a clean surface with a generous amount of flour and use a rolling pin (or a pasta maker) to roll each piece of dough as thinly as you can, into a long rectangular shape. Continually dust the rolled dough with flour to make sure it doesn't stick. Using a pizza cutter or sharp knife, cut into fettuccine-sized strips. Dust with flour again to prevent the noodles from sticking and lay them out on a baking sheet until you are ready to cook them.
  3. To make the sauce, mix the pumpkin purée and cream together using a blender or hand blender. In a large skillet, melt the butter and minced sage over low heat. Add the pumpkin and cream purée to the sage butter and stir. Bring to barely a simmer and turn off the heat. Add salt and pepper to taste. Place aside until pasta has been boiled.
  4. To make the sage chips, pour the oil in a small skillet or saucepan and place over medium heat. The oil is hot enough when sage leaf dropped in starts to sizzle right away. Fry a few sage leaves at a time, just until crispy. It takes about 15 seconds, depending on how hot your oil is. Do not let them burn or turn brown. Remove from the hot oil and place on a paper towel. Sprinkle with salt.
  5. Meanwhile, bring a large pot of about 4 quarts of water to boil. Add a tablespoonful of salt and the pasta to the boiling water. Stir the pasta gently to prevent from sticking together. Cook for about one minute. Place your pumpkin sage sauce back on medium-low heat and bring the pot of pasta close to skillet. Using tongs, quickly remove the pasta from the water and transfer it directly into the pumpkin sauce. You do not need to drain the pasta, a little water in the sauce is fine. Add all but a tablespoonful of the grated parmesan and cook over low heat for one to two more minutes, until the sauce has thickened and the pasta is cooked to your liking. Do not overcook or the pasta will get mushy. Serve immediately and top with the rest of the grated parmesan, a little grated nutmeg, and the sage chips.

Read more about this recipe on PBS Food.

8. Pumpkin Apple Baked Beans

Credit: PBS Food

Ingredients

  • 6 cups cooked white navy beans or great northern beans (about 2 cups / 1 pound dry beans)
  • 1 cup of bean cooking water
  • 1 apple cored and cubed
  • 3 cups peeled pumpkin flesh
  • 1 cup pumpkin purée (optional)
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 1/4 cup tomato paste (or 1/2 cup tomato sauce)
  • 1 small head of garlic, minced
  • 2 Tbsp molasses
  • 2 Tbsp honey
  • 1 Tbsp dijon mustard
  • 2 cups sweet apple cider
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Soak the dry beans for 12 hours, making sure there is at least 3 inches of water above the beans. Drain the beans and place them in a saucepan filled with enough water to cover 2 inches above the beans. Simmer the beans on medium-low heat for 1 to 2 hours, until tender and fully cooked. Drain the beans but reserve 1 cup of the cooking liquid.
  2. In a large dutch oven or heavy-bottomed pot, sautée the onions in the olive oil until soft and translucent. Turn the heat to low and add the tomato paste, molasses, honey, dijon mustard, minced garlic, and pumpkin purée. Cook for a few minutes, stirring well until smooth. Whisk in the apple cider and add the beans and reserved cup of cooking liquid. Mix well.
  3. To cook the beans, you can either simmer them on your stovetop on low heat or bake them in the oven at 300F. Cook them for one hour, and then add the chopped pumpkin, chopped apple, and the butter. Cook them for another 1 to 2 hours, or until the beans have reached the desired consistency. If you prefer your baked beans to be very thick, you can remove the lid for the final hour of cooking so that more liquid evaporates (in which case give them a stir every now and again to make sure they don't burn at the bottom). In the last hour, you can add the salt and pepper and make any flavor adjustments needed. For instance, I sometimes add an extra tablespoon of molasses if I find they aren't as sweet as I would like. Serve warm.

Read more about this recipe on PBS Food.

9. Pumpkin Stuffed with Everything Good

Credit: PBS Food

Ingredients

  • 1 pumpkin, 2½–3 pounds
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • ¼ pound stale bread, thinly sliced and cut into ½-inch chunks
  • ¼ pound cheese, such as Gruyère, Emmenthal, cheddar, or a combination, cut into ½-inch chunks
  • 2–4 garlic cloves (to taste), split, germ removed, and coarsely chopped
  • 4 slices bacon, cooked until crisp, drained, and chopped (my addition)
  • About ¼ cup snipped fresh chives or sliced scallions (my addition)
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh thyme (my addition)
  • About ⅓ cup heavy cream
  • Pinch of freshly grated nutmeg

Directions

  1. Center a rack in the oven and preheat the oven to 350° F. Line a baking sheet with a silicone baking mat or parchment, or find a Dutch oven with a diameter that’s just a tiny bit larger than your pumpkin. If you bake the pumpkin in a casserole, it will keep its shape, but it might stick to the casserole, so you’ll have to serve it from the pot — which is an appealingly homey way to serve it. If you bake it on a baking sheet, you can present it freestanding, but maneuvering a heavy stuffed pumpkin with a softened shell isn’t so easy. However, since I love the way the unencumbered pumpkin looks in the center of the table, I’ve always taken my chances with the baked-on-a-sheet method, and so far, I’ve been lucky.
  2. Using a very sturdy knife — and caution — cut a cap out of the top of the pumpkin (think Halloween Jack-o-Lantern). It’s easiest to work your knife around the top of the pumpkin at a 45-degree angle. You want to cut off enough of the top to make it easy for you to work inside the pumpkin. Clear away the seeds and strings from the cap and from inside the pumpkin. Season the inside of the pumpkin generously with salt and pepper, and put it on the baking sheet or in the pot.
  3. Toss the bread, cheese, garlic, bacon, and herbs together in a bowl. Season with pepper — you probably have enough salt from the bacon and cheese, but taste to be sure — and pack the mix into the pumpkin. The pumpkin should be well filled — you might have a little too much filling, or you might need to add to it. Stir the cream with the nutmeg and some salt and pepper and pour it into the pumpkin. Again, you might have too much or too little — you don’t want the ingredients to swim in cream, but you do want them nicely moistened. (It’s hard to go wrong here.)
  4. Put the cap in place and bake the pumpkin for about 2 hours — check after 90 minutes — or until everything inside the pumpkin is bubbling and the flesh of the pumpkin is tender enough to be pierced easily with the tip of a knife. Because the pumpkin will have exuded liquid, I like to remove the cap during the last 20 minutes or so, so that the liquid can bake away and the top of the stuffing can brown a little.
  5. When the pumpkin is ready, carefully, very carefully — it’s heavy, hot, and wobbly — bring it to the table or transfer it to a platter that you’ll bring to the table.

Read more about this recipe on PBS Food.

Sponsored

Next Avenue brings you stories that are inspiring and change lives. We know that because we hear it from our readers every single day. One reader says,

"Every time I read a post, I feel like I'm able to take a single, clear lesson away from it, which is why I think it's so great."

Your generous donation will help us continue to bring you the information you care about. What story will you help make possible?

HideShow Comments