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Health

The Secrets Your Brainwaves Can Tell About Your Health

This podcast discusses how, and why, researchers study brainwaves


(Editor’s note: This podcast is from The Not Old – Better Show.)

In this episode of The Not Old — Better Show, I interview R. Douglas Fields, an adjunct professor in the neuroscience and cognitive science program at the University of Maryland, College Park, and the author of the new book Electric Brain: How the New Science of Brainwaves Reads Minds, Tells Us How We Learn, and Helps Us Change for the Better.

What is as unique as your fingerprints and more revealing than your diary? Your brainwaves. Analyzing brainwaves has been possible for nearly a century, but neuroscientists are now widening their awareness of the wealth of information brainwaves can hold about who we are — and that information’s power. Fields examines the current frontiers of the new brain science and what its research means for medicine, technology and our understanding of ourselves.

Fields explores how information drawn from brainwaves has the potential to reveal hidden signifiers of mental illness and neurological disorders; the role brainwaves can play in improving cognitive performance and health and how they can be used to control devices, from prosthetic limbs to fighter drones. He also looks ahead to the possibilities that future developments in brainwave research may open.

Paul Vogelzang
By Paul Vogelzang
Paul Vogelzang is an award-winning blogger, podcaster, writer, and producer, known for his down to earth accessible reporting and advice for men and women in the 50 + age community. Paul is the host of The Not Old - Better Show launched in 2014. Paul shares vibrant, focused, entertaining content on the show, and writes frequently about the subjects of fashion, grooming, entertainment, technology, fitness and relationships for those in the 50+ age community.

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